You are here

Four benefits of crane operator training

June 7, 2017

The majority of crane accidents are caused by human error, making training a key priority for crane-dependent industries. Crane operator training is one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways to improve safety and productivity.

With over 80 certified Operator Instructors in the Americas and a total of 35 courses, Konecranes Training Institute is the leading trainer and certifier of overhead crane operators, inspectors and technicians.

“The aim of our crane operator training is to provide operators with information on proper and precise techniques for safe crane operation,” says Jim Lang, General Manager at Konecranes Training Institute.

In addition to its extensive crane operator training and other safety programs, the institute also offers an Operator & Rigging Train-The-Trainer course, which allows companies to better prepare their operators by having more knowledgeable in-house personnel at their own locations.

No matter the course, Lang considers an open mindset as the most important prerequisite to a successful training session.

“It is important for students to approach the training with an open mind and embrace the concepts that we teach. This enables them to get the maximum out of the sessions,” Lang says.

The aim of refresher training is to make certain that operators are doing their job properly and advance their skills as well – for example, improve their ability to control load swings and teach them advanced rigging techniques.

Benefits of trainings are manifold

In addition to full-day training courses, Lang recommends operators undergo refresher training every two to three years. Refresher training usually consists of a half-day session.

“The aim of refresher training is to make certain that operators are doing their job properly and advance their skills as well – for example, improve their ability to control load swings and teach them advanced rigging techniques,” outlines Lang.

In addition to the benefits of the trainings for the customer, Lang also views these courses as a good way for Konecranes to know its customers better, with trainers usually spending a full eight-hour day at the site.

“Spending a full day with the customer gives trainers a wealth of insight. We can use this valuable knowledge and feedback to improve our service further,” Lang explains.

He emphasizes that the most important benefit of crane operator training for Konecranes still involves working to increase the safety of its customers.

“Each year, we provide instruction to over 11,000 people in the US and Canada; that means that each year we help influence the safety of 11,000 of our customers,” concludes Lang.

Here are four benefits of crane operator training:

1.

Newly hired personnel working on site will know how to properly and safely operate overhead cranes and hoist equipment.

2.

Businesses meet regulatory requirements by providing crane operator training.

3.

Refresher training advances the skillset of the operators.

4.

Konecranes Training Institute also offers an Operator & Rigging Train-The-Trainer course, which allows companies to better prepare their operators by having knowledgeable in-house personnel at their own locations.

For more information on the courses offered by the Konecranes Training Institute, please visit www.cranetrainingu.com.

Click on the link below to see a video testimonial from a student about the Operator & Rigging Train-The-Trainer course on Konecranes Training Institute’s YouTube channel.

 

Text: Nina Lindqvist
Photo: Konecranes